Organic Dandelion Root / Liver Support / Herbal Tisane / Digestive Support / Urinary Support / Herbalism
Organic Dandelion Root / Liver Support / Herbal Tisane / Digestive Support / Urinary Support / Herbalism
Organic Dandelion Root / Liver Support / Herbal Tisane / Digestive Support / Urinary Support / Herbalism
Organic Dandelion Root / Liver Support / Herbal Tisane / Digestive Support / Urinary Support / Herbalism
Organic Dandelion Root / Liver Support / Herbal Tisane / Digestive Support / Urinary Support / Herbalism
Organic Dandelion Root / Liver Support / Herbal Tisane / Digestive Support / Urinary Support / Herbalism

Organic Dandelion Root

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Botanical Name: Taraxacum officinale

Common Name: Dandelion Root

Grown: Certified Organically Grown (OG)

Form: Dried root raw, cut

Origin: USA

Common Names: Blowball, cankerwort, dent de lion, lion's tooth, priest's crown, pu gong ying, puffball, swine snout, white endive, wild endive

Dandelion is a treasured botanical with a long history of use in traditional herbal practices worldwide. This perennial herb has a sunny flower head that is composed of hundreds of tiny flowers, deeply cut leaves that form a basal rosette, and a thick taproot. Taraxacum officinale can be decocted as dandelion tea, added to herbal tea blends, made into dandelion extract, or infused into body care recipes.

Dandelion was traditionally used in many systems of medicine to support digestive and gastrointestinal health. Additionally, dandelion was traditionally used to support liver health, healthy urinary function and has mild diuretic support.

Dandelion is a sunny, subtle, yet incredible plant that has been used for thousands of years in Traditional Chinese Medicine and is mentioned in traditional Arabian medicine in the tenth century. It has been used for centuries in traditional medicine practices all over the world as a restorative tonic, edible food, and in herbal beers and wines.

Dandelion bears a sun-yellow flower head (which is actually composed of hundreds of tiny flowers) typical of the Asteraceae family, that closes in the evening or during cloudy weather and opens back up in the morning, much like its cousin calendula. When the flower is closed, to some, it looks like a pig's nose, hence one of its names, 'swine's snout.' It is a perennial herb with deeply cut leaves that form a basal rosette, somewhat similar to another family member, the wild lettuce, and has a thick tap root which is dark brown on the outside and white on the inside. It is native to most of Europe, Asia, and northern Africa, naturalized all over the world, and commonly found growing alongside roads and in lawns as a common weed.

The use of dandelion was first recorded in writing in the Tang Materia Medica (659 B.C.E.), and then later noted by Arab physicians in the 10th century.

In the United States, various indigenous cultures considered dandelion to be a prized edible, a gastrointestinal aid, a cleansing alterative, and a helpful poultice or compress. The Bella Coola from Canada made a decoction of the roots to assuage gastrointestinal challenges; the Algonquian ate the leaves for their alterative properties and also used them externally as a poultice. Additionally, the Aleut steamed leaves and applied them topically to sore throats. The Cherokee believed the root to be an alterative as well and made a tea of the plant (leaves and flowers) for calming purposes. It is interesting to note that dandelion was used by the Iroquois as well. They made a tea of the whole plant, and also considered it be an alterative tonic. In the southwestern U.S., in Spanish speaking communities practicing herbalism, dandelion is called 'chicoria' or 'diente de leon.'

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) it is referred to as 'Xin Xiu Ben Cao' or 'Pu Gong Ying' and considered to be energetically sweet, drying, and cooling. According to TCM, dandelion clears heat from the liver and has a beneficial effect on the stomach and lungs, and it can uplift the mood and support lactation.

Precautions:
No known precautions. We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

All teas and herbs are sold per ounce.


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